Security Resources

DVR and IP Camera Hacking – Only the Beginning

There have been a number of articles and proof-of-concept hacks in recent years illustrating vulnerabilities in IP camera software, access control systems, and the like. Some have raised awareness about fundamental flaws in technology – like the relative insecurity of common proximity card readers, unprotected programming access to a locking system, and simple methods to access a camera’s video feed. Most of the attention following these announcements is focused on the ability of a device to be bypassed or viewed (in the case of a camera), which misses a critical point.

While it is concerning that a replay attack can spoof an access card, and that an IP camera may not provide adequate security against unauthorized viewing, the real danger lies in the potential of these systems to be hacked and modified to serve some other purpose. Here are a few examples – and a prediction: We will see one or more of these in the wild within 24 months.

Scenario One:  The IP Camera Worm
Many IP cameras are designed using FPGAs, not microprocessors, so their ability to run arbitrary code is limited. This trend is changing, however, and as cameras adopt a more standards-based architecture, they will become powerful edge devices running operating systems that can be attacked like any other. Some higher-end models can already run cron scripts, handle video analytics, and manage local storage of data. They are, without exaggeration, computers with a lens and network connection. They are also commonly thought of as “appliances,” with a plug-and-play approach applied to many projects. It is feasible that a worm or other malware could infect these devices as early as the point of manufacturing, or when they are plugged into the installer’s laptop for programming. The software might lie dormant or attempt to infect other cameras or computers on the same network. Affected devices could even be used to launch a Denial of Service (DoS) attack against the recording server or some other target. The common practice – at least in larger systems – of segmenting cameras onto their own LAN might help to reduce this potential, but since the recording server is usually connected to other network(s) for remote viewing and administration, malware capable of infecting the server is a logical progression of this threat.

Scenario Two:  The surveillance DVR/NVR (Network Video Recorder) as a point of entry into corporate networks
Executives like video surveillance systems – and for good reason. As networks and video quality have improved, these systems have saved organizations tremendous amounts of money. Investigations can be performed more efficiently, guards can be reduced, travel costs can be cut, and the list goes on. This means, of course, that the video systems need to be accessible to various departments via the corporate network. Most implement some type of basic security, like requiring a remote user to connect over a VPN, but few have taken steps to totally isolate the video traffic from other network systems. Since many DVRs and NVRs are full-fledged PCs running Windows or Linux, they are vulnerable to the same kinds of attacks as any other server or workstation, but they are easily overlooked and could become a “zero-day” vulnerability or convenient back door into the network.

Scenario Three:  Unintended “Integration”
Every year, security hardware and software moves closer to delivering on the promise of interoperability. It has been a long road, and there are still miles to go, but today’s systems come equipped with protocols for a variety of devices, in order to enable integration. This means that building a “security network” within an enterprise often makes sense. To gain the full benefit from your systems, they need to be able to interact, and since capabilities are sure to be added later – anything that might need to share data ends up on the same segment. When industrial controllers, manufacturing equipment, or other critical systems make this list, the scene is set for security devices to be used as a launchpad for espionage or manipulation. It can seem logical to group these systems together – after all, the “security network” should be a safe place for any important devices, right?

So, why is a hack inevitable?
Fundamental to the problem is that these systems and devices are routinely installed without sufficient thought given to security, and without a plan for ongoing monitoring and maintenance. Furthermore, some of the latest features of alarm panels, home automation controllers, IP cameras and DVRs require Internet access or remote server connections just to function properly, opening a vector of attack that, again, is not well understood or monitored. This means that segmenting a network or “sandboxing” the application may not be an option unless the owner is willing to sacrifice functionality.

I realize that it is not much of a stretch to predict that a hackable device connected to a network might be used in a new and nefarious way… but let’s hope I’m just plain wrong.

 

For More:

DVRs are being targeted by hackers, says security expert – Article discussing vulnerabilities in consumer DVRs

Bypassing IP Camera Authentication (example)

OpenIPCam site, dedicated to hacking various cameras and the development of custom firmware